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Air Wisconsin Pilot Interview Profiles

Date Interviewed: April 2014
Summary of Qualifications: 730 TT, 300 Turbine, Military R-ATP mins, ATP written
Were you offered the job? Yes
Pilot Interview Profile:
Interview site was also in PHL. Flying stand by was a little bit of a headache but I made it there by 4-5 the day prior. My advice, when booking with US Airways when coming out of a busier airport, attempt to start your day with a noon-ish flight in case you get bumped by other stand-by. I say this for two reasons. First, we had a guy coming from DFW that waited 12 hours to get on a plane and didn't arrive until 1030pm. Second, our interview group should have had 19 people, and there were only seven of us there.

Day started as other gouges say. About two hours or so was dedicated solely to company history, background, and answering any questions you might have. My advice, ASK QUESTIONS! Seem interested. Even if this isn't your first rodeo, they are looking at you being a good fit for their culture more than anything. One of the first sentences out of a line captain on the panel in the morning was, "Be yourselves. We all know you can fly and are qualified to be here, or you wouldn't be here. We really just want to know if we can sit with you for 8 hours a day in a cockpit for a four day trip." They all do a very nice job of making it very informal (or as informal that an interview can be). After the Q&A session, we took a 50 question multiple choice test. Never found out the results of the tests, but it was all out of the ATP books, so I would brush up on that if it has been a while since you have taken the written. I took mine four days prior so it was still a little fresh.

Here is where the waiting game began. They anticipated 19 people, so the company had three two-person panels conducting interviews at the same time. I wouldn't plan on being this lucky. All three panels were a line captain and an asst. chief pilot. From my counting, they took about 30-minutes each, but if you aren't one of the first ones to go, it feels like forever. Make use of that time, talk with the other candidates. They make sure you know you are not interviewing against each other, that ideally they want to hire you all because they need pilots. This is a true statement. My experience was a little heavier on the HR side of the house. Typical questions…What makes a good CPT? FO? What drew you ti AirWis? Strengths? Areas for improvement? The hardest question I got asked all day was an HR question. Your crew goes out and you stay in, and at 2am a FA knocks on your door crying, drunk, saying the CPT sexually assaulted her, what do you do? Just go with your common sense on these questions. DO NOT bring her into your room. Console her in a public open place, and tell her to get her management involved as well as call your chief/asst chief pilot and make them aware. The whole incident may not even be true, but this is not a problem for you to negotiate, let management handle these types of things.

Tech portion was very straightforward just like the previous gouge. ELA's, approach plates, whats this, whats that? What can you descend to on an ILS. Wheres the MAP? They also covered airport signs, light gun signals, METAR/TAF's. They only have a Jepp ELA so if you are used to FAA (NOS) charts, get your learn on. I struggled through this part just because of unfamiliarity. After the tech was over and they ask if you have questions, make sure to have questions to ask. I found common ground with both interviewees and that helps tremendously when they talk about voting you off the island. They are people too, and they want to see that you are a good communicator and will breath life into the cockpit.

After the panel interview was complete it was back to the break room. I again waited about 45 minutes to an hour when Scott called me back for fingerprinting. I sincerely thought I did not get the job, but Scott said they were telling people individually the positive results. First interview, only interview thank God. Its not a lie. When the other gouges tell you to relax, that they make it as comfortable an environment as they possibly can, they mean that. Everyone on the AirWis team made me feel like I belonged, that they were glad we were there, and were as excited as we were at the potential of us flying the line with them. This company carries with it a great reputation in the industry and I now see why. From the line to the admin employees at the PHL location, what a pleasurable experience. Fair warned though, they will not hire just anyone. Two of the seven didn't make it through. I think this was in large part due to personality conflicts. Being personable and trainable is a really great thing to be in this interview!
Date Interviewed: April 2014
Summary of Qualifications: Helicopter Pilot, 700+ hrs, Instrument rated
Were you offered the job? Don't Know
Pilot Interview Profile:
Interview site was in Philadelphia, PA. Connected out of Charlotte. I got there a day early and got familiar with the area and found the site of the interview pretty easily but it was still good to know exactly where I was going to be at 0800 the next morning.

I arrived at the location for the interview about 30 minutes early and there were already about a dozen interviewee's there (13 total). We were invited into a conference room just after 8am and we received a short overview/introduction from the people that would be interviewing us as well as an overview of the company and benefits. Pay and training were the main points that were covered, as that was what most everybody wanted to know about.

Next we had a 50 question written test covering basic aviation knowledge. Some of the things covered on the test were A/S in Class B, microbursts, transponder setting for hijack or radio failure, thunderstorms, etc.

After everybody finished and the tests were collected they were graded and then placed in random order for interviews. You were not told how you did on the test. During this period AWA had lunch brought in for us (pizza). Most everyone sat in the break room and made small talk to kill time until they were called in for their interview.

My interview had two people, Matt and Rob. Matt asked the HR questions, Why Air Wisconsin? What makes a good F/O? What characteristics do you look for in an F/O? Then Rob asked me Tech questions. I wasn't familiar with JEPP's or NOS but I got through both pretty well. My flying was military and we had different App Plates but they were similar. I was asked to read METAR, went over ELA's and airport signage. Pretty straight forward.

After this part of the interview I went back to the break room to wait to be fingerprinted. After this was completed, I was released to leave and go catch my flight home.

The employee's were very friendly and really laid back. They were sincere and made you feel comfortable about being there and that they wanted to hire you. They were straightforward with you and answered your questions honestly as well.
Date Interviewed: October 2013
Summary of Qualifications: ATP mins + written, and 130 multi
Were you offered the job? Don't Know
Pilot Interview Profile:
AWAC will positive space you on US Airways to Norfolk, and if you need to connect, like I did, it'll probably be either Charlotte, or Philly. The interview was at Chesapeake Regional, which is definitely out of the beaten path, in the sticks, sorta. All the hotels they send in the packet do not drive you there, so you'll need to rent a car, unless you're a local. They give you the corporate discount, and it's a pretty drive depending which way you go.

Interview started at 0800 local at Horizon Flight Center (the main building), and went until about 1400 local. I drove there the day before my interview to make sure I knew how to get there, and wouldn't be late. There was 5 of us total with varying backgrounds. Flight instructor, cargo pilot, etc...You meet with 3 recruiters; line captain, chief pilot, and HR lady (or guy) depending who does the HR part.

You start off with filling out a form for fingerprints, which are manual prints, then once everyone is done you have the 3 amigos give you a very nice speech about the company, background, future plans, etc... You have a packet on the company right in front of you. Then, they turn the floor over to you to ask questions for about 30 minutes. Then, all 3 walk out, and give the interviewee's a 10 question multiple choice written test. Questions were something like what does a rectifier do, if the approach requires RVR16, but RVR is inop whats the required vis, moderate icing will be most prevalent at what temperature (+5ºc), what do you look for when doing a VOT check, etc... After that is collected, they hand you a profile sheet for the sim, NOT to be memorized. After that, all the interviewees pile into the pilot lounge, and they have you group into groups of 2; one does sim eval while the other does HR/Tech.


HR: Simple questions. HR representative reads off a piece of paper - what makes a good team? Why AWAC? What can you bring to AWAC? What's your 5-10 year goals and plans? etc... Simultaneously, the chief pilot will look at your logbook, and ask you questions based off flights that are in there, and will ask you resume' questions. Why did you leave XYZ, why do you want to leave your current employer, ever failed a checkride, ever been fired, or asked to resign from an employer? etc...

Tech: Chief pilot will ask you whether you want Jepp or Gov't charts for the approach plates to brief. He will open up to about 4-5 different approaches, and ask random questions off each one. How do you know how to go missed on this ILS? You're doing the ILS with glideslope inop, how do you go missed? (it's a LOC only, so time and/or dme). What's the significance of the "A" in VOR/DME-A approach? What's the highest obstacle on this chart? Is the tower opened 24/7? That's about 3/4 of those. Then, he moved onto airport signs and markings. Runway hold short line, ILS critical hold short line and when does that come into effect (800ft cig, 2sm or directed by atc), etc... That was it! Literally NOTHING tricky here at all.

Sim: Done in a RedBird simulator. Everyone that typed a review here said the sim was "sensitive". It's not. It rolls at 1 degree per hour so it seems. It doesn't turn for crap, so you have you reeeeally put in a lot of input to get it to move anywhere. Pitch is a little better, but not a lot. The person in the simulator does a great job of explaining to you to not worry about memorizing the profile, and s/he will do literally everything except bring the gear up and fly for you. They're just checking to see if they put you in a $2,000/hr simulator at FlightSafety, will you know how to fly or not... Everything I saw is nothing more than BAI (basic attitude instrument) flying. Private pilots w/instrument ratings that are current could pass the sim no problem. Setup like a Dutchess. Takeoff rwy 6 at GRB, fly runway heading, rotate around 75, pos. rate, gear up, climb to 3,000ft, intercept 100º radial off GRB VOR (which he already put in for me before takeoff), climb to 5,000ft and left turn to around 330 (BAI - climbing turn, like I said before, nothing hard), descend to 3,000 and left turn heading 290'ish (BAI descending turn), fly direct GRB VOR and he'll say to hold as published (on your profile sheet), cross the VOR, do your entry, once you cross the VOR inbound he'll ask which way would you turn for the hold, get it right and he'll just give you vectors for ILS 6 into GRB. Landing isn't graded, but make it pretty. After this, you're done! Good luck to all that apply! Once done, verify w/HR lady, but you should be good to go home, and they'll be in touch with you in a few days. Good luck!
Date Interviewed: July 2013
Summary of Qualifications: 2500 TT, 590 PIC Cessna 421, 545 SIC Beech King Air 350, 355 SIC Cessna Citation 750. SIC Type ratings in King Air 350 and Citation 750. ATP. 37 years ATC.
Were you offered the job? Yes
Pilot Interview Profile:
Met with regional chief pilot Matt, check airman Jeff and HR rep Meg at Chesapeake Airport (CPK), 15 miles south of Norfolk, Va. They all made us feel very comfortable and relaxed. We started the paperwork section and got fingerprinted. After this was completed, Matt gave us a background of the company plus some benefits and training. Jeff then gave us some information on the redbird sim, set up as a Beech Duchess (BE76). We then had a 10 question aeronautical question test with such questions as: What does a transformer/rectifier do? Answer: It converts AC to DC. When will precip become a factor for icing? Answer: When temp is 5 degrees Celcius or less. They had a question about VOR/VOT check, and I think the answer was 360 degrees to, but I am not sure. This stumped everybody. After the written test was completed, we started the HR/Technical/Sim portions of the interview. The sim is raw data (no command bars).Everything is set up for you. No need to program the GARMIN 530. Jeff handles everything for you, including tuning radios, etc. He makes you feel very comfortable in the sim. He will be writing some stuff, such as if you are proficient in tracking a radial, etc. Don't worry about it. You take off from Green Bay, Wi airport, fly runway heading, intercept a radial off the Green Bay VOR, which is 5 NM NW of the airport. You are also climbing to 3000 feet, the after a bit, you get a climb to 5000 feet and a turn, then another turn to the southwest and descent to 3000 feet. Then you are cleared direct to Green Bay VOR, hold as published for ILS runway 6 approach. Very straightforward. Then you get vectors for the ILS runway 6 approach to Green Bay to minimums. They give the whole scenario on a sheet of paper so you can look at it before you go in for the sim check. The sim is a bit touchy, typical for a sim. HR is standard: Why Air Wisconsin, what makes a good F/O and Capt. What would your supervisor say about you and one of your areas that you could improve on. What can you bring to Air Wisconsin? A few TMATT questions. The technical was pretty straight forward. Airport signage, Jepp or NOS plates. How to determine a missed approach point on a non precision approach (timing or DME), when do you hold short of the ILS critical line. Answer When the weather is less than 800 ft. ceiling or visibility is less than 2 miles or when ATC tells you to hold short of the line. They ask you to read a METAR and TAF, and a few NOTAMS. Definitely not difficult. Again Matt, Jeff and Meg make you feel very comfortable and tell you they want you to succeed. They say the job is yours to lose. It is not a giveaway interview, but very fair.
Date Interviewed: June 2013
Summary of Qualifications: COMMERCIAL PILOT ASEL AMEL INSTRUMENT 7124 TT 854 MULTI
Were you offered the job? Don't Know
Pilot Interview Profile:
INTERVIEW CONDUCTED AT HORIZON FLIGHT CENTER AT CHESAPEAKE VA VERY NICE AND RESPECTFUL PEOPLE. FIRST IT WAS THE FINGER PRINTS THEN A PRESENTATION ON THE COMPANY.THEY GAVE US A 10 ATP TYPE TEST NO PASS/FAIL IN THIS TEST.AFTER THAT WE WERE PUT IN TWO GROUPS OF TWO ONE WAS INTERVIEWED WHILE THE OTHER ONE WAS ON THE SIM AND VICEVERSA. HR QUESTIONS: WHAT MAKES YOU A GOOD FIRST OFFICER, NAME YOUR STRENGHTS AND WEAKNESSES,WHY SHOULD WE HIRE YOU,ETC. THE TECHNICAL PORTION WERE QUESTIONS ON APPROACH PLATES AND AIRPORT MARKINGS STUDY THOSE WELL.ALSO YOULL NEED TO READ A METAR OUT OF CLT. THE SIM WAS CONDUCTED ON A BEECHCRAFT DUCHESS SIMULATOR VERY STRAIGHT FOWARD, THE EVALUATOR DOES EVERYTHING FOR YOU JUST FLY THE THING DO NOT USE ELECTRIC TRIM ITS VERY VERY SENSITIVE USE MANUAL TRIM.TAKEOFF ON RWY HEADING TO 3000 THEN CLIMB TO 5000 ON ANOTHER HEADING THEN A HOLDING AND THEN VECTORS FOR THE ILS. AS I SAID BEFORE VERY NICE AND FRIENDLY PEOPLE THEY MAKE YOU FEEL AT EASE AND THEY STRESS THEY WANT YOU TO SUCEED NOT ONLY IN THE INTERVIEW BUT ALSO ON THE TRAINING AND ON THE LINE.LOOKS LIKE A VERY GOOD COMPANY.GOOD LUCK TO ALL!!!
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